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An Ageing Population – a Common Challenge for the Baltic Sea States

The Max Planck Institute, supported by the Council of the Baltic Sea States, launched the report “Ageing Workforce, Social Cohesion and Sustainable Development. Political Challenges within the Baltic Sea Region.”

How to increase the number of older people in the workforce?

In the ninth report in a series on the changing demographics in northern Europe, the Max Planck Institute, supported by the Council of the Baltic Sea States, has studied ageing population and how to increase the number of older people in the workforce.

The population in the Baltic Sea Region is increasingly getting older, and in a majority of the countries in the region a third of the population will be over 65 years of age in 2050. The changing demographics do not only have to be met with new solutions in the healthcare and pension system, but also in the labour market and the economy, together with better integration of migrants.

One potential solution to the challenges ahead is to increase the number of older people in the labour market. Continuous opportunities to develop new skills, an adequate salary, recognition and support at work are factors that are important in managing to keep older people in the workforce.

To prolong working life, labour policies will have to pay attention to factors that improve the quality of work and raise the will to stay in the labour force, but also decrease the impact of factors that make people want to leave work. The focus must, therefore, be on lifelong learning and health improvement measures.

The report comes with a number of policy recommendations, and the expectation is that the diverse Baltic Sea Region could be seen as a natural laboratory for testing the efficiency of a policy.

You can access the Report here and find the Policy Brief here.

For the presentation given by Dr Andreas Edel and Dr Paul Becker go here.

For the press release in Swedish, please go to MyNewsdesk.

 

 

 
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